CONTENTS

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IMAGINATION AND PRAYER

 Ideas to Try:
 

Personal symbols, prayer and meditation

Remembering

Storytelling

'Except you become as little children...'

Vision of a healed world

Dying and letting go

Many paths to Bethlehem

 

 

 

 

 

 

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INTRODUCTION

performer Technology, which surrounds us on every side, has a tendency to make us literal-minded, down to earth, and even unimaginative. Of course we need to be practical - efficient administration is just as valuable a gift from God as any other. Christian feet are meant to be kept on the ground just as firmly as any other kind of feet.

But this down to earth part of us should not be developed at the expense of our intuitive, imaginative side, and playful side which does not insist on everything being black or white but is happy to play around with possibilities.

One can imagine the Creator playing with an infinite number of possibilities: taking up some and letting others go but finding delight in all.

To use our imagination in prayer is to open ourselves more widely to the wonder of God and to discern connections between things which show again and again the unity of creation and show us more of how we belong to each other in Christ.

We may find it hard at first to use our imagination but it is worth persevering. For some it may never be the main path of prayer, but a kind of auxiliary, occasional path.

Some people will find it is possible to go back imaginatively again and again to the bible stories, which become much loved friends, scenes which become richer with every renewed visit: for others, familiarity breeds not contempt but dullness and dryness. For such people it may be better to start on imaginative prayer from our own experience or from our own world, and allow that experience to lead us to God.